The New Standard of Care for Orthopedic and Surgical Irrigation?

Microcyn

Orthopedic and Surgical Irrigation

Packaged in a sterile, spikeable bottle that is ideal for use in orthopedic and surgical applications, Oculus will introduce Microcyn OSID in January of 2010. Oculus will leverage its 30-second kill times in solution against dangerous pathogens such as MRSA and VRE. Unlike current standards of care, Microcyn OSID is non-foaming, non-sensitizing, and based upon evidence, does not appear to facilitate resistant strains of bacteria.

Adam Landsman, DPM, Ph.D. and assistant professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School in Boston, who was lead investigator in a Phase II trial in which the Microcyn Technology was used to treat mildly infected diabetic foot ulcers in 2007, stated: “The current standard for surgical wound cleansing and irrigation involves the use of products that do not kill the MRSA infection in-vitro. This is important in light of the skyrocketing proliferation of these dangerous bacteria as well as the evolving ‘super bug’ mutations. Microcyn is also highly attractive since it does not produce foam, which hampers visualization of the wound. And finally, with the health community so vitally focused on cost savings, the Microcyn OSID will actually cost less than the current combination of saline and bacitracin.”
For years, the standard of care for surgical irrigation was saline infused with bacitracin, an antibiotic first discovered in 1945. According to the journal Orthopedics (2008; 31:37), due to resulting resistance, bacitracin is no longer considered effective for MRSA decolonization. Surgical irrigation and debridement remains the standard of care for removal of necrotic tissue and is used when the tissue removal needs are extensive, or when the patient has a serious infection associated with the surgical wound site.
According to Medtech Insight, a Division of Windhover Information, in 2004 there were approximately 36 million surgical wounds and nine million open trauma wounds in the United States. Initially, Microcyn OSID™ will be marketed by the Advocos sales team that is currently selling the professional formulations of the Microcyn-based wound care products.

“The current standard for surgical wound cleansing and irrigation involves the use of products such as bacitracin and saline that do not kill many types of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staph aureous (MRSA) in-vitro.  Potentially this places our patients at higher risk for post-operative infections.  This is particularly important in light of the skyrocketing proliferation of these dangerous bacteria as well as the evolving “super bug” mutations.  Microcyn has been shown to kill MRSA on contact, and is also highly attractive since it does not produce foam which hampers visualization of the wound.  Foam associated with bacitracin and similar solutions makes vacuuming of waste fluid more difficult, as well.  Furthermore, Microcyn OSID will actually cost less than the current combination of saline and bacitracin.”

Adam Landsman, DPM, PhD
Assistant Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School Division of Podiatric Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Baker 3, 1 Deaconess Road, Boston, MA    02215
alandsma@bidmc.harvard.edu
773-457-2446 CELL
617-632-8428 OFFICE
617-632-7090 FAX